Update, July 2019

It was the yearly bookbash at Lowdham on Saturday 29th June. As usual I enjoyed my time there, running a stall and joining with other Shoestring Press poets in a reading to celebrate the launch of Paul Binding and Malcolm Carson’s collections. I read from the Electric Artisan, which is still fairly current (no pun intended). The temperature was at a record high so visitors and participants alike were wilting by 2pm; bunewark.jpgt Lowdham has several pubs and places to eat, as well as an on-site cafe. As I knew I’d be trapped behind a stall table for the whole day apart from the reading, I took sandwiches and fizzy water – as an ex-Brownie and Girl Guide, it pays to Be Prepared. It’s a shame I didn’t see what else was happening around the site, since Book Fair Saturday is rich in performance and incident; I can recommend it as an ideal festival for those who find some of the big ones excluding towards audience members. At Lowdham, the atmosphere is always inclusive and informal. I have no picture from the event, so the image here is from Newark, which is also worth visiting!IMG_1378.JPG

There’s a Places of Poetry thing going on, as great and good people from another part of the UK have decided that Poetry is often linked to Place, and maybe we should all write poems to demonstrate it. Their website is quite lovely, although nothing unusual in itself when you can operate Google Maps and get your campsite showing up alongside its visitor rating. In this area, the nearest participating venue is Ely Cathedral –  so off I went, hoping to take part in something and maybe get a poem on the site for a Fenland location. Meeting Jen Hadfield was a delight, since I have enjoyed her work for years and I have her second collection, Nigh-No-Place (Bloodaxe). A Fens-based poet read one of her own works, and project facilitators explained about the idea as a whole, sporting some well-designed project T-shirts which should be on sale somewhere; they’re missing a trick. I wrote a few lines as a result of the experience, and I hope they will become a poem. Other poems have gone on the website at their real-life locations – one nr. Loweswater in Cumbria, two in rural Lincs, and one near Water Orton in the West Midlands. People can leave ‘likes’ on the site, which is a great idea –  I’ve liked several on my imaginary journey around the ‘Poly-olbion’ map, and I hope the favourite poems are gathered up for a new anthology later.

On July 14th I was headlining at Cheltenham Buzzwords. Now, this date was one I’d long had in mind, because I knew of its overall quality as a good gig for poets building up a performance schedule. But it took a while to come up, largely because its popularity (and the foresight of its organiser Angela France) meant the schedule for 2019 was booked at least a year ago. That’s a lesson to any poets looking for outlets – you really have to think ahead and decide where you would like to appear at least six months in advance, if not longer. As my reading coincided with spectacular cricket/tennis finals and the last night of Ledbury Poetry Festival, I didn’t expect a full turnout at the venue on Bath Road – but I made a number of booksales which sent me back holst photo.jpghome very happy indeed. I had most of the day in Cheltenham, so I went in search of the Holst Birthplace Museum ‘cos I’m a fan. Alas it was closed, although the curator explained they would have let me in ‘if only’ and ‘because’, and so on. Yes, the staff were on duty, but their exhibition-changers were in. Since I’m embarrassed easily, I didn’t make a fuss and I went away; although I bet someone who’d flown long-distance would have put up more of a fight to get in. Holst was not only an innovator in music, he was widely regarded as an inspiring teacher, and he’s one of my all-time arts heroes. There’s an impressive statue, however –  in Imperial Gardens near the Town Hall. The sculptor created an effect which means that on a night with any stars visible, the bronze figure will be ‘conducting the planets’. It’s nice when sculptors give them something to do.

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